Dr. William Davis – The Benefits of Becoming Wheat-Free

by on December 13, 2011      

in Don't Miss..., Health & Wellness

Dr. William Davis

Dr. William Davis, author
of the bestselling book
Wheat Belly

It’s Rainmaking Time!® endeavors to separate the wheat from the chaff; but Dr. William Davis, the author of Wheat Belly, questions wheat altogether. You will never look at bread the same way again after he shares his startling findings on wheat. A preventive cardiologist, recognized public speaker on the health effects of wheat, and the founder of the Track Your Plaque program for heart disease prevention and reversal, Dr. William Davis discovered that removing wheat from the diet can reduce body weight by 25-30 pounds over several months, relieve arthritis, asthma, acid reflux, and irritable bowel syndrome, and improve circulation, mental clarity, and emotional stability. In this segment, we go far beyond celiac disease and gluten intolerance into a vast web of destructive health effects uniquely caused by wheat, one of the most widely produced grains in the history of humankind.

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{ 16 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Cecile Martin November 28, 2013 at 6:34 pm

In your interview w/ray peat you mentioned taking progesterone at bedtime. Would you tell me in what form,and where i can get it.
I havethe powdered form and know to mix it w/worm olive oil. Is there a simpler way?
Listen to that interview periodically and read all his articles.
Cecile martin

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2 Kim Greenhouse November 29, 2013 at 8:49 am

Dear Cecile,

There are a few ways progesterone is taken before bedtime: Capsule of either 100 or 200 milligrams, which helps women sleep
and there is a creme that is taken at a mucosal level. Both require testing. The most updated testing is a 24 hour urine
test. You will need a doctor who is actually current about female hormones who really understands this stuff or a naturaopath
who is overseen by a medical doctor who also really understands hormones.We did an interview with Dr. Jonathan Wright that you may enjoy.
Here it is:http://itsrainmakingtime.com/2012/jonathanwright/. Thank you for writing us. Kim Greenhouse

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3 Tim December 29, 2011 at 5:45 am

Gluten-free has been on my to-do list all year. I kw that it’ll improve how I feel and my running and exercise. Thanks for the great article.
Tim

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4 Ashley December 28, 2011 at 1:33 pm

Wonderful interview! I fully believe that going wheat (barley, rye & oat) FREE has significantly increased my health. Dr. Glidden told me to eliminate these (and a few more “Bad” foods) from my life back in September. Between that and his supplement program I’ve gained my health back and have never felt so good!

I bumped into a woman in the Gluten Free section of my local Natural Foods Market (PCC) who told me that her sister-in-law was coming to visit from Holland for Christmas. Being from Holland she could eat the bread and wheat grown in her country but when she came to visit in the USA, she became extremely sick from our wheat!!!

I told her about this interview and told her to listen to it. She thinks that the wheat in Holland is a totally different strain, one that has not been modified or tampered with, and this is why her sister-in-law only develops Celiac when she visits the USA!

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5 Joseph July 8, 2013 at 11:33 am

WoW makes sense I had heard about that when Wheat was brought up to Europe in ancient times…. it was bred with European grasses…….

And probably further hybridized when it got to the US?…..
I have noticed big weight gain and ickys coming out my skin pores(rejection of unhealthy foods)

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6 Bernard December 27, 2011 at 5:09 am

After living in China for a year, no wonder there are hardly any fat Chinese in China.

Chinese diet is very low in wheat, they don’t have the habit of eating bread or grain products. Chinese eat alot, vegetables, meat, rice, etc…but they DONT get fat for some reason…? Their diet is very low in Wheat and Dairy. Many Chinese never had cheese in their lifes, except when they go to Mcdonald.

HongKong however is a little different, there are a few fat people but still very few apart. HongKong residents have adopted western wheat diet (bread, dairy, sweet cakes, etc…)

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7 Christopher T December 28, 2011 at 10:58 am

Actually some parts of China (it’s a big place) eat wheat. In those provinces with the highest wheat consumption, the highest rates of heart disease are present. We know this thanks to The China Study. The authors of the China Study chose to basically ignore this data in favor of their anti-animal protein-fat hypothesis (which is unfounded when one actually looks carefully at the massive China Study data).

http://rawfoodsos.com/2010/09/02/the-china-study-wheat-and-heart-disease-oh-my/

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8 Kim Greenhouse January 2, 2012 at 9:26 am

We invited the author of the China study to the show and he was not interested in being our guest. Very few people that we have invited from Nobel peace prize winners to best selling authors have shown this lack of interest. I did read the entire book though. Thank you for your comment.

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9 JOANNE PRESSER December 14, 2011 at 1:39 pm

THANK YOU I HAVE BEEN WHEAT FREE FOR 2 YEARS AND IT IS REALLY NOT THAT DIFFICULT.

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10 Jeff Thomas March 28, 2012 at 5:32 am

Thats great to know you been on wheat free for 2 years. I you have any good foods to share I would love to have some. Thanks Jeff

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11 Robert Rominger December 14, 2011 at 12:09 pm

Forget about gluten. If you cut out all grains, especially wheat, there will be no gluten. I’ve been wheat and grain free for 9 weeks now (since early Oct), and the benefits have been quite a surprise. A very pleasant surprise. Losing weight at about a pound weekly. Joint paint diminished 90%. Appetite greatly reduced combined with feeling much fuller sooner at each meal. Energy level up. There are many more; I don’t want to turn this into a testimonial.

This whole endeavor has been a double-edged sword in that I’m reaping the benefits, but I am becoming increasingly aware of the fraud being perpetrated on the populace by the USDA and the mega-agri-businesses. Hopefully, our awareness of the harmful effects of wheat will become more and more widespread, with the result of taxpayer dollars no longer spent on subsidizing something so deleterious to the country’s health.

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12 Julie February 16, 2012 at 1:37 am

I have had the same journey. I am glad I have found out this amazing information about wheat but I am also shocked, saddened, and angry at what feels like a huge fraud and conspiracy against America. Not only has my diet changed, but my worldview has changed also.

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13 Christopher T December 14, 2011 at 11:19 am

I’m a completely gluten/wheat free person. It’s not that hard once you eliminate it.

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14 you know who December 14, 2011 at 9:36 am

It’s the mold that causes all the problems, not the wheat itself. Mold spores in the grain and in finished product..It’s why bread grows mould so easily…It’s already in the bread !.

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15 Deb December 14, 2011 at 11:11 am

I know I feel better leaving out pretty much all grains from my own diet, but wheat in particular. Even beer. :-( LOL

I would suspect that baking would kill off mold, no? And the commercial processing of grains includes drying to keep it from spoiling, which I also imagine would minimize mold.

If you have more information on that, though, I’m certainly open to learning more. All I know is that when I stay away from wheat, my joints don’t hurt any more, and that suits me fine.

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16 Christopher T December 14, 2011 at 11:27 am

I agree, perhaps mold plays a part in some situations, but I think the point here is that the very molecular constituents of this grain are problematic. There’s a reason why gluten is called the protein with teeth. When I eat anything with gluten I have extreme anxiety and or depression.

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